Important Storm Updates

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HEAVY RAINFALL UPDATE

 

The Village has received an exceptional amount of rainfall over the last four weeks. In just the last 24 hours we have received more than 4 inches of rain Village-wide.

Projected rainfall totals tell us those levels will continue to increase. We understand that water levels are high, it is based on the heavy amount of rain falling in a short amount of time.

We appreciate your patience as we work to keep you updated regarding the potential for localized flooding. 

 Vegetation & Debris Collection Update

 

Wellington contractors have cleared the Village’s roadways of Hurricane Irma debris and have begun making multiple passes through neighborhoods to continue picking up storm-generated debris. Your patience is necessary and greatly appreciated as we systematically collect storm debris.

Residents should place storm-generated debris on the public right-of-way, the area of residential property that extends from the street to the sidewalk, utility pole, or easement. Make sure the debris pile is clear of storm drains and any obstacles including mail boxes, utility poles, vehicles, water meter vault, fire hydrant, or any other above-ground utility.

PHASE 1 – First Pass: Wellington has contracted with a private debris removal companies to assist with hurricane recovery. Crews have already cleared our major streets and thoroughfares of vegetative debris. Wellington debris removal contractors are collecting storm-generated debris in neighborhoods throughout the Village. The contractors will make multiple passes through Village neighborhoods to collect hurricane debris, so neighbors will have more than one opportunity to place hurricane debris out for collection. We thank our neighbors for their patience as we work together to get Wellington back to normal.   

 PHASE 2 – Second Pass: In 3-4 weeks, crews will begin removal of non-vegetative hurricane debris (i.e. fences, shingles, screens, roofing materials, etc.) along with any vegetative debris not collected during the first phase.

Debris Pickup Schedule


Wellington continues its recovery efforts with Public Works crews working around the clock to clear debris from our roads and public-rights-of-way in the wake of Hurricane Irma. 

WASTE COLLECTION UPDATE: Wellington contractors have cleared the Village’s roadways of Hurricane Irma debris and have begun making multiple passes through neighborhoods to pick up storm-generated debris. Your patience is greatly appreciated as we systematically collect storm debris. Residents should place storm-generated debris on the public right-of-way, the area of residential property that extends from the street to the sidewalk, utility pole, or easement. Make sure the debris pile is clear of storm drains and any obstacles including mailboxes, utility poles, vehicles, water meter vault, fire hydrant, or any other above-ground utility.

VEGETATION DEBRIS REMOVAL: Any vegetation should be placed at the curb for pickup. Please do not bag any vegetation. DO NOT mix vegetation with any other trash. Wellington debris removal contractors will make multiple passes through all Village neighborhoods to collect hurricane debris, so neighbors will have more than one opportunity to place hurricane debris out for collection. We thank our neighbors for their patience as we work together to get Wellington back to normal.   

MOSQUITO CONTROL UPDATE: Due to a large mosquito hatch after Hurricane Irma, the Palm Beach County Division of Mosquito Control will be conducting aerial spraying in the Western communities beginning at sunset starting September 25th, weather permitting.  In the meantime, please call the AIR SPRAY HOTLINE at 561-642-8775
to receive information about tonight's spray - if it was successful or if it has been postponed.



 



News

  • NHC Atlantic Outlook09/25/2018 1:16 AM


    Atlantic 2-Day Graphical Outlook Image
    Atlantic 5-Day Graphical Outlook Image


    ZCZC MIATWOAT ALL
    TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM

    Tropical Weather Outlook
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
    200 AM EDT Tue Sep 25 2018

    For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

    The National Hurricane Center is issuing advisories on recently
    downgraded Subtropical Depression Leslie, located about 1200 miles
    west of the Azores.

    1. A broad area of low pressure located about 300 miles south of Cape
    Hatteras, North Carolina, continues to produce showers and
    thunderstorms on its north side. Satellite data indicate that the
    circulation of the low is elongated and not well organized.
    However, this system could still become a tropical depression later
    today while it moves northwestward. By tonight and Wednesday,
    additional development appears unlikely, due to strong upper-level
    winds, while the system moves northward and north-northeastward near
    the southeastern United States coast. Regardless of tropical cyclone
    formation, this system will likely enhance rainfall across portions
    of northeastern South Carolina and eastern North Carolina later
    today and tonight. In addition, dangerous surf conditions and rip
    currents are expected along portions of the North Carolina coast
    today. For more information, please see products from your local
    National Weather Service office.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours...medium...50 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days...medium...50 percent.

    2. The remnants of Kirk are located about 1100 miles east of the
    Windward Islands and are moving quickly westward at around 25 mph.
    This system continues to produce a large area of showers and
    thunderstorms, along with winds to gale force on its north side.
    However, satellite data indicate that the system still lacks a
    closed circulation. This disturbance could redevelop into a
    tropical cyclone during the next couple of days before it moves
    into an area of highly unfavorable upper-level winds while it
    approaches the Caribbean Sea. Interests in the Windward and
    Leeward Islands should monitor the progress of this disturbance as
    gusty winds and locally heavy rains are likely even if the system
    does not redevelop into a tropical cyclone. For more information on
    this system, see High Seas Forecasts issued by the National Weather
    Service.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours...medium...60 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days...medium...60 percent.

    3. Subtropical Depression Leslie is forecast to become post-tropical
    tonight after it merges with a cold front over the central Atlantic.
    After that time, Leslie could reacquire subtropical or tropical
    characteristics by the end of the week as it meanders over the
    central Atlantic.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days...high...70 percent.

    High Seas Forecasts issued by the National Weather Service can be
    found under AWIPS header NFDHSFAT1, WMO header FZNT01 KWBC, and
    on the Web at https://ocean.weather.gov/shtml/NFDHSFAT1.shtml.

    Forecaster Cangialosi


  • NHC Eastern North Pacific Outlook09/25/2018 1:14 AM


    Eastern North Pacific 2-Day Graphical Outlook Image
    Eastern North Pacific 5-Day Graphical Outlook Image


    ZCZC MIATWOEP ALL
    TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM

    Tropical Weather Outlook
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL
    1100 PM PDT Mon Sep 24 2018

    For the eastern North Pacific...east of 140 degrees west longitude:

    1. Showers and thunderstorms are gradually becoming better organized
    in association with a low pressure system located about 350 miles
    south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Environmental conditions
    appear conducive for additional development, and a tropical
    depression is likely to form later today or tonight while the
    system moves west-northwestward, well offshore of the coast of
    Mexico.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours...high...90 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days...high...90 percent.

    2. A trough of low pressure located about 1600 miles east-southeast
    of Hilo, Hawaii, is producing disorganized shower activity. Some
    gradual development of this system is possible through the end of
    the week while it moves westward into the central Pacific.
    * Formation chance through 48 hours...low...10 percent.
    * Formation chance through 5 days...medium...40 percent.

    Forecaster Cangialosi